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Massive Line of Dangerous Storms Take Aim at Midwest, Northeast

AOL Weather

Severe weather, including a possible derecho, could affect 64 million people in 10 states.

WASHINGTON (AP) – A gigantic line of powerful thunderstorms could affect one in five Americans on Wednesday as it rumbles from Iowa to Maryland packing hail, lightning and tree-toppling winds.  

Meteorologist are warning that the continuous line of storms may even spawn an unusual weather event called a derecho (duh-RAY’-choh), which is a massive storm of strong straight-line winds spanning at least 240 miles. Wednesday’s storms are also likely to generate tornadoes and cause power outages that will be followed by oppressive heat, said Bill Bunting, operations chief at the National Weather Service’s Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Okla.

The risk of severe weather in Chicago, Indianapolis, Cincinnati and Columbus, Ohio, is roughly 45 times higher than on a normal June day, Bunting said. Detroit, Baltimore, Washington, Milwaukee, Pittsburgh and Louisville, Ky., have a risk level 15 times more than normal. All told, the area the weather service considers to be under heightened risk of dangerous weather includes 64 million people in 10 states.

“It’s a pretty high threat,” Bunting said, who also warned that the storms will produce large hail and dangerous lightning. “We don’t want to scare people, but we want them to be aware.”

Wednesday “might be the worst severe weather outbreak for this part of the country for the year,” said Jeff Masters, meteorology director at Weather Underground.

You can have tornadoes and a derecho at the same time, but at any given place Wednesday the straight-line winds are probably more likely.

Last year, a derecho caused at least $1 billion in damage from Chicago to Washington, killing 13 people and leaving more than 4 million people without power, according to the weather service. Winds reached nearly 100 mph in some places and in addition to the 13 people who died from downed trees, another 34 people died from the heat wave that followed in areas without power.

Derechoes, with winds of at least 58 mph, occur about once a year in the Midwest. Rarer than tornadoes but with weaker winds, derechoes produce damage over a much wider area.

Wednesday’s storm probably won’t be as powerful as 2012’s historic one, but it is expected to cause widespread problems, Bunting said.

The storms are the type that will move so fast that “by the time you see the dark sky and distant thunder you may have only minutes to get to safe shelter,” Bunting said.

The storms will start late morning or early afternoon in eastern Iowa, hit Chicago by early afternoon and move east at about 40 mph, Bunting said. If the storm remains intact after crossing the Appalachian Mountains, which would be rare for a derecho, it should hit the Washington area by late afternoon or early evening, he said.

For Washington, Philadelphia and parts of the Mid-Atlantic the big storm risk continues and even increases a bit Thursday, according to the weather service.

http://weather.aol.com/2013/06/12/massive-line-of-dangerous-storms-take-aim-at-midwest-northeast/

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5 Responses to Massive Line of Dangerous Storms Take Aim at Midwest, Northeast

  1. The Other Mark says:

    When these storms wreck havoc on communities where is FEMA? They are busy stopping supplies at the Canadian border. The only help these folks can expect is from their neighbors. Remind me again, What Country is this?

  2. NC says:

    HAARP is frying in those EXACT mid-west areas right now and it’s buiding frequency FAST! This ain’t a natural storm by any way shape or form. See the map at the link below:

    http://www.theweatherspace.com/haarpstatus-north-america/

  3. NC says:

    http://www.theweatherspace.com/haarpstatus-usa-shortwave-detection/

    “About: Shortwave detection is a new cutting edge method to detecting electromagnetic fields within the atmosphere that may in the future detect where a tornado might strike. The focus here is tornadoes, due to the belief electricity can make them stronger or weaker.”

    That about says it all. It’s a HAARP storm.

    • . says:

      from:
      http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2010/arch10/100121wind.htm

      ———

      Meteorologists are not sure how tornadoes form, but they are often associated with lightning storms. It seems that the key to understanding tornadoes is to think of them as rapidly rotating electric discharges. Just as copper wires carry electrons for power transmission, so do tornadoes. The difference is that electrons are moving at several centimeters per hour in a wire, while flying around at many meters per second in a tornado. The result is that the tornado forms an enormously powerful electromagnetic force field called a “charged sheath vortex.”

      It is commonly believed that weather is driven on Earth primarily by the Sun’s thermal influence on the atmosphere. As we rotate beneath our primary, gases and dust absorb solar radiation at varying rates and in varying degrees. When any particular region heats up, the air expands and loses density, creating a relative low pressure area. Cooler air, being denser, will naturally flow into the bottom of the warm, low pressure region, causing an upwardly rotating convection cell to form.

  4. NC says:

    It’s HAARP, dude. Plain and simple.

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