Trigger-Happy Cop Shot One of His Own and Kept Blasting Away

The Daily Beast – by Justin Glawe

A detective who worked narcotics with an undercover officer walked up to a car, shot his fellow officer twice, and then seven more times against the victim’s pleas.

The number of signs that Albuquerque Police Lieutenant Greg Brachle ignored or didn’t see before putting nine .45-caliber bullets into his fellow officer’s body are simply staggering.

There was the fact that Brachle knew Detective Jacob Grant was involved in a drug buy last January, a sting the superior officer walked up on while Grant sat in an undercover police car. There were Grant’s clothes, an outfit specially worn according to a safety protocol to prevent friendly fire incidents. Even Grant’s position in the car—behind another undercover narcotics agent in the driver’s seat—was to signal to other officers that the two men were cops.

But most damning—and the most confusing part of it all—is that Brachle and Grant were well-known to each other. For nearly two years, they worked in the narcotics division of the department.

The lieutenant and the detective had “substantial, frequent, and almost daily interactions with each other,” said the civil lawsuit filed last week against the city of Albuquerque and the police department.

According to Bernalillo County court documents filed by Grant’s lawyer, Grant was taking part in a drug buy with another undercover officer while the sting was being monitored by Brachle and others. A briefing was held before the bust and officers in attendance learned not only of Grant and his fellow undercover cop’s presence in the car, but also of descriptions of their clothing and seating positions. Brachle didn’t attend the briefing, Grant’s lawyer says, but nonetheless took an “active and aggressive role in the operation.”

Brachle went against protocol by approaching the driver’s side of the car Grant was sitting in. The lieutenant again broke the rules when he ripped open the door and started firing into Grant, alleging without offering a single “hands up,” or “freeze,” according to the complaint.

Brachle’s actions were called “overzealous and aggressive,” in Grant’s lawsuit. Another way of saying it might be that Brachle went John Wayne, swooping into a situation he apparently knew little about, guns blazing. Even if Grant wasn’t a cop, Brachle’s alleged zealousness to fire on a suspect presenting no apparent threat would be disturbing.

Brachle first put two bullets into Grant’s torso at point-blank range. The detective’s body slumped over in the back seat. Brachle then fired seven more times as Grant tried to crawl away.

“Please stop shooting,” the detective pleaded as the lieutenant kept firing.

The damage was substantial: Almost all of Grant’s vital organs were struck and he lost 80 percent of his blood that day, nearly dying. After several surgeries, Grant can expect a lifetime of more medical work and costs to recover.

The lawsuit filed by Grant’s lawyer says not only did Brachle ignore training, protocol, and all manner of common sense while firing on his fellow officer, but he also violated Grant’s constitutional rights by using an excessive amount of lethal force.

The same charge can be found in just about every lawsuit filed by people shot by police.

Brachle went against protocol by approaching the driver’s side of the car Grant was sitting in. The lieutenant again broke the rules when he ripped open the door and started firing into Grant, alleging without offering a single “hands up,” or “freeze,” according to the complaint.

Brachle’s actions were called “overzealous and aggressive,” in Grant’s lawsuit. Another way of saying it might be that Brachle went John Wayne, swooping into a situation he apparently knew little about, guns blazing. Even if Grant wasn’t a cop, Brachle’s alleged zealousness to fire on a suspect presenting no apparent threat would be disturbing.

Brachle first put two bullets into Grant’s torso at point-blank range. The detective’s body slumped over in the back seat. Brachle then fired seven more times as Grant tried to crawl away.

“Please stop shooting,” the detective pleaded as the lieutenant kept firing.

The damage was substantial: Almost all of Grant’s vital organs were struck and he lost 80 percent of his blood that day, nearly dying. After several surgeries, Grant can expect a lifetime of more medical work and costs to recover.

The lawsuit filed by Grant’s lawyer says not only did Brachle ignore training, protocol, and all manner of common sense while firing on his fellow officer, but he also violated Grant’s constitutional rights by using an excessive amount of lethal force.

The same charge can be found in just about every lawsuit filed by people shot by police.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/09/02/trigger-happy-cop-shot-one-of-his-own-and-kept-blasting-away.html

11 thoughts on “Trigger-Happy Cop Shot One of His Own and Kept Blasting Away

  1. We have read so much about corruption in the Albuquerque police department in the last couple of years, its time for the mayor or governor to step in and replace the whole d*mned department,

  2. Unfortunately, still no body count and no real win per se. Grant will continue to feed off of taxpayer’s money via retirement, pension, and lawsuit winnings paid for by US and even more will be wasted on investigating, prosecuting and possibly incarcerating Brachle. Or he will get another cop job in another department and continue being a psycho.

    It feels good anyway? :/

  3. “After several surgeries, Grant can expect a lifetime of more medical work and costs to recover.”

    Some consolation, anyway. He’ll never be back on the streets to perpetrate violence on unsuspecting Americans. And we can always hope for a (fatal) turn for the worse.

    “Brachle’s actions were called “overzealous and aggressive,”

    Insane would be much closer to the mark.

  4. A feel good headline but the guy lost 80% of his blood and survived. Darn. One more jew shill sucking us dry for life because he was a sanctioned criminal breaking the law and drug running.

    If all cops stopped buying drugs I bet the market would slump 80%.

  5. It’s poetic justice that a gestapo thug gets to see firsthand what it’s like to be engaged by the terrorist group that he himself is a part of.

    1. It’s poetic justice that a Cheka or NKVD thug gets to see firsthand what it’s like to be engaged by the terrorist group that he himself is a part of.

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