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A Good Clean Kill, And Other Beauty Secrets

Piece of Mindful – by Steve Kelly

I’m sure many of our “baby boomer” friends will remember the soap ads from the 1950s and 60s.  Clean was big business then, clean was beautiful, and nobody wanted to stink.  B.O. (body odor) was a hot topic thanks to decades of marketing.

Dial wasn’t the first “deodorant” soap, but it was the first one that didn’t smell like turpentine or paint thinner – oh, I’m talkin’ “Lifebuoy.” Lifebuoy, originally made by Lever Bros. (now Unilever) in England, has been around since 1895.  The smell was phenol, a compound made with carbolic acid extracted from coal tar.  To fight B.O. you could instead smell like an auto body repair shop.  

Dial, named for its “round-the-clock” anti-B.O. protection (from perspiration), was introduced in 1948 by Armour Co. (yes, the meat-packers) in Chicago. Armour had made tallow-based laundry soap since 1888.  With the help of some clever chemists, Armour added hexachlorophene, or G-11 or AT-7.  How about those numbers?  By 1949 it was marketed nationwide as the leading antibacterial, deodorant soap, and it didn’t have that Lifebuoy industrial smell.

But hidden behind Dial’s catchy jingle, pretty faces and soft-fear messaging lurked what would become known decades later as a deadly neurotoxin.   The “bactericidal agent” hexachlorophene (2,2-dihydroxy-3,5,6-3’,5’6’-hexachlorodiphenyl-methane), G-11 or AT-7 was marketed heavily on tv and in print ads, which boasted of its ability to kill high numbers of bacterial flora on the human skin.  Problem was, it was permeating through the skin and causing serious toxic reactions inside the body, including the brain, resulting in illness and death.  This was all done before the disclaimers we are all too familiar with today that just openly tell you of the side-effects, including death.

These classic commercials are like watching today’s pitch-men in slow motion, making it easier to see the action and its desired influence.  Here are a few examples:

1966  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxhABh8r2UY

1955  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fU92lSjSIQg

Compare that to the “slick” rapid-fire approach today:

2018  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c75knWrNsO8

Hexachlorophene has been imbedded in baby powder, baby oil, toothpaste, mouthwash, throat lozenges, cold creams, deodorants, antiperspirants, hair tonics, shampoos and cosmetics.  It’s also used in agriculture as a soil fungicide, plant bactericide and acaricide (mites and ticks, etc.).

In 1972, after over 20 years of unrestricted, over-the-counter use, hexachlorophene was NOT banned, but restricted by federal regulation to 1% concentration in over-the-counter sales.  Concentrations over that amount required a prescription from an agent in a lab coat (MD).  The white lab coats are symbolic of the typical patient-doctor relationship; as lab rat is to lab researcher/technician.

Reports in the mid-1960s began a long, slow journey that ultimately led to use restrictions by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1972 – over a year after the EPA released research findings that found hexachlorophene was “toxic” and able to enter the bloodstream via “dermal absorption.”  As early as 1969 researchers reported “visible brain damage” in rats from small concentrations of hexachlorophene.   The American academy of Pediatrics warned in 1971 that oral use in toothpastes or throat lozenges may be “poisonous to children.”   Is it worth “pinholes in the brainstem” so we can rest easy about industry-induced social stigma associated with B.O.?

These MFers are trying to kill us with bio-chemical weapons, and they know it!  Now, we know it too.  Pinholes in the brain, pinholes in the brain, pinholes…   Are you getting this?  Hexachlorophene, a widely-used pesticide, mixed with baby powder.  FYI, baby powder is talc, which contains (serpentine) asbestos, which is a known carcinogen.  In France in 1972, 204 children were poisoned, and 36 of them died after being exposed to toxic talc contaminated with 6.3%hexachlorophene in what was later excused by investigators as a “manufacturing error.”   Those numbers again.

We are treated like vermin by the ruling class because we volunteer.  Like moths to the light, we believe the bullshit, follow the media propaganda like the good little farm animals we have been conditioned to become, and will kill to defend the bullshit when challenged by new evidence.  I suppose the idiocy of commoners who never figure out how “The Game” is played is what keeps our masters laughing out loud while sipping Macallan, 64-year-old, single-malt Scotch ($460,000/bottle at auction) with fellow peerage after an afternoon of backgammon at the club.

And they’ve peddled their poison to acne sufferers world-wide as “skin cleansers” under the trade names:  pHisoDerm and pHisoHex.  Both products originally contained 3% hexachlorophene.   pHisoDerm was reformulated after the 1% restriction was imposed in 1972 by the FDA.  PHisoHex, made by Sanofi-Aventis, continued the 3% formulation as a “prescription body wash.”  Sanofi-Aventis discontinued all production of pHisoHex in 2013.  That only took a little over 40 years, my dear, fellow debt-slaves.

I wish that was the end of our little tale, but reformulated new-generation “antiseptics” are prepared similarly to hexachlorophene.  But that’s not the worst of it because guess what is the byproduct in the manufacture of the disinfectant hexachlorophene?  Dioxin!  Yes, it’s a known carcinogen, and yes it has contaminated untold regions of the U.S. and the globe.  In the U.S. alone, it is estimated that hexachlorophene was once produced at a rate of 4 million pounds a week for the soap and cosmetic industries.  I haven’t found any comparable production rates for agricultural applications, but it’s got to be huge.

There’s hardly a living creature on this planet that hasn’t been exposed to dioxins or dioxin-like compounds (DLCs).  Dioxins can be released into our airshed by municipal waste incineration or by burning trash.  Forest fires and volcanoes produce dioxins too.  Over 90% of human exposure to dioxin is by eating contaminated animal products, where dioxin is absorbed and stored in fat tissue where it accumulates all along the food chain.

Today people are exposed to dioxins primarily by eating contaminated animal products.  Dioxins are absorbed and stored in fat tissue and, therefore, accumulate in the food chain.   The case against hexachlorophene leads to serious damage to humans, even death.  This is all necessary background for the single (most important) point of the unrestricted poisoning of untold victims over decades:  PINHOLES IN THE BRAINSTEM, people!  And what could possibly slither its way into your brain through a pinhole?

Why would anyone deliberately, and with planning and purpose, released these chemical weapons?   I have no idea why at this point, but there are brainstem pinholes.  There surely must be a REASON for this attack on unsuspecting commoners.  We are, of course, “the enemy.”

If after the 1950s they knew full well that penicillin was creating “super bugs,” then why in the name of Sam Hill was broad-spectrum, antibiotic, full-body soap still being used in the 1970s?  The tv advertising bragged of the “long lasting” toxic film, while knowing it could penetrate the skin and enter the blood steam and eat pinholes in the brainstem.  It takes a special kind of creep to unleash this kind of widespread, irreparable damage, following an especially diabolical plan.  Who all was in on it?  And what is the cryptic agenda that extends well beyond the physical harm?

Well, that’s it for Part I and the hexachlorophene nightmare.  In Part II, we’ll follow the toxic bunny trail to Agent Orange (no, I’m not referring to Trump), PCBs, and we’ll visit the House of Global Carnage: Monsanto and explore the living hell it has wrought on Planet Earth.

But wait!!  There’s more!  If you order before midnight tonight, we’ll throw in this lifetime supply of Dioxin, absolutely free!!!

Remember one thing for sure, our silence is our consent.

https://pieceofmindful.com/2018/10/09/a-good-clean-kill-and-other-beauty-secrets/

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One Response to A Good Clean Kill, And Other Beauty Secrets

  1. Katie says:

    Learn to make your own soap sounds like a solution.

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