listen here

Or you can mail donations to Henry Shivley at P.O. Box 964, Chiloquin, OR 97624

12 New Guns That Turned Heads At The SHOT Show

Off the Grid News – by Terry Nelson

Every year the National Shooting Sports Foundation hosts the annual SHOT Show event, which allows the gun industry to showcase its newest firearms and related gear. The following is just a fraction of what was new at this year’s contention in Las Vegas that could be of interest to defensive mined folks.

Glock’s G19X is essentially a G19 slide on a G17 frame. Some are advocates of this idea, others not so much. Reports are that the trigger has been much improved. Glock will most likely do well with this new offering.  

Ruger’s PC (pistol caliber) Carbine in 9mm has been around for a number of years. The PC can now accept Glock pistol magazines, in addition to Ruger pistol magazines! What’s so appealing to me about this carbine is its takedown ability. It comes apart just like the Ruger 10/22 takedown.

Walther’s well known PPQ pistol now has a smaller version, the “SC” model. Short grip and short slide, in 9mm, it’s an 11-shooter. A bit small for some, but many will like it. PPQ’s trigger is hard to beat.

Another Ruger offering is the “Security 9” pistol, a low-cost version of the G19. It has a “backward-facing” manual safety lever, which I would recommend leaving in the “off” position anyway. Nice trigger at five pounds with a crisp reset. For a serious, carry pistol, it’s not bad, and pricing is very reasonable.

Springfield Armory’s hammer-fired XDE is another pistol that has its unique following as a hammer-fired system. It is very flat (single column) and easy to carry. Slide manipulation is reported to be very easy. There will be many women who will like it for that reason alone. This is a nice carry pistol.

Honor Defense is making a polymer-framed, single-column 9mm (8-shooter) with modular grip components, and comes apart exactly like a SIG 320.

Beretta’s APX pistol is a G17-sized, double-column carry pistol. Reports are that it surpasses all their other models. Many Beretta fans are recommending it with confidence.

Also from Beretta is the model 1301 shotgun and is at the top of the list of defensive purposes. Folks are saying it has much less recoil than the model 1201. The model 1301 will be a good option for those looking for a 12ga shotgun for serious applications.

SIG has a new model, the P365. This is a striker-fired, flat, 9mm concealment pistol, designed to compete with the S&W Shield, Kahr PM9, Walther PPS/M2 and G43. The 365 comes from the factory with night sights, a nice addition. The magazine is basically single stack that makes the 365 an 11 or 12-shooter depending on which magazine you use.

Kahr Arms now makes a nice AR selling in the $750 range. Khar pistols are now available in the “C,” “S” and “P” series, “P” being the nicest finished and expensive. All are reported to run well.

DSArms, well-known makers of FALs, is making the CTC, a folding stock with magazine-release near the front of the trigger-guard. If you are looking for a serious 308 rifle, take a look at what DSA has to offer.

POF (Patriot Ordinance Factory) is producing the “Revolution” gas-piston AR rifle in 308 caliber. For those who love 308 rifles, this is another great choice in a defensive rifle. It’s about the same weight and size as a typical AR in 5.56×45.

It would appear that the industry is putting much effort into compact and flat 9mm pistols with the concealed carry market in mind and with good cause. More and more folks are serious about providing for their everyday defense.

© Copyright Off The Grid News

Off the Grid News

This entry was posted in News. Bookmark the permalink.
1109

7 Responses to 12 New Guns That Turned Heads At The SHOT Show

  1. Enemy of the State says:

    I wish Ruger would chamber the PC in .40 and or .45
    Both would be nice
    Maybe in due time

    .45 carbines I like
    Plus it’s a round that I have many different tools I can use it in
    I don’t have a .40 carbine, so I could end up liking that a lot

  2. BMF says:

    I wouldn’t trust a single gun on that list. A couple of them MIGHT turn out to be good, such as the Sig P365, but the jury is still out. So why spend money on the unknown when the proven is available?

    I’ve learned the hard way that few brands consistently hold up to lots of hard use. Consequently, I stick with the tried-and-true. That means:

    * HK (or maybe FN) for pistols
    * Any of the few proven AR makers for a rifle: e.g., Colt, Bravo Company, LMT, or a high-end maker like Larue
    * The FN SCAR 16 or 17 is another good choice if you have the money
    * A high-end AK from a company like Arsenal can also be very solid, though 5.45×39 and 7.62×39 are inferior to 5.56 NATO for most purposes

    • # 1 NWO Hatr says:

      Ghosts can be extremely reliable as well, BMF.

      • BMF says:

        Ghosts? Sorry, not following you. Is that a brand?

        • Henry Shivley says:

          A ghost gun is one you build yourself, usually by constructing a complete lower or completing the construction of, say, an 80% lower. No serial numbers.

          • BMF says:

            Oh, “ghosts” in the sense of ghost guns. Got it, thanks.

            Sure, if someone has the time and inclination (or need) to make his own weapons, more power to him. But that requires extensive knowledge: dimensional tolerances, proper materials, heat treatments, etc., plus all the skill and equipment to make it work.

            ETA: An 80% lower receiver wouldn’t be too tough, but then the purchase of an upper half would likely be on the books unless paid for with cash.

        • # 1 NWO Hatr says:

          “But that requires extensive knowledge: dimensional tolerances, proper materials, heat treatments, etc., plus all the skill and equipment to make it work.”

          Untrue, BMF.

          I watched one built from start to finish. All you need is a drill press, a template, and assembly instructions.

          Pay for all the parts with cash – untraceable.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *